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Korea’s Economy Volume 27

Publication: September 2011

Achievements in Seoul and Korea's Role in the G-20

Domestically, the decision for Korea to take on the presidency of the Group of 20 (G-20) in 2010 was received with both excitement and concern. It was the first presidency by a country not a member of the Group of Seven. There was also skepticism that, as the world economy…

The Economics of Reunification

The term “reunification” can be defined as a process of forming one united country from two or more countries that had been separated by internal or external causes. Based on this definition, South Korea and North Korea, and China and Taiwan, can be considered as separated nations that aim to…

Human Resources and Korean Reunification

Much has been written over the years on the geopolitical, security, legal, institutional, economic, and policy requisites for success in a hypothetical Korean reunification. One issue that has attracted much less attention is the role that human resources may play in any prospective reintegration of the still-divided Korean nation. The…

Korea-China Economic Partnership: The Third China Rush

The year 2010, which is when the Korean economy recovered from the 2008 global financial crisis, seems to have been the turning point to rerecognize China’s importance in many respects. Previously, Koreans saw China as a mere export platform for Korea. Now China has become a major economic partner, vital…

Increasing Dependency: North Korea’s Economic Relations with China

As the economy of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea becomes increasingly isolated, it depends more and more on the People’s Republic of China for survival and development. The PRC is North Korea’s closest ally; largest provider of food, fuel, and industrial machinery; and arguably the country most able to…

A New Phase in China–North Korea Relations

Fundamental changes to the nature of politics inside China’s Communist Party are occurring at the same time Beijing and Pyongyang work out a new relationship. These developments are already affecting the external policies of the two hard-line states, whose formal military alliances are with each other only. For almost a…